Is It a Cold or Is It Flu?

Seasonal flu activity often begins early October Because colds and flu share many symptoms, it can be difficult (or even impossible) to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. Special tests that usually must be done within the first few days of illness can tell if a person has the flu.

The symptoms of flu can include fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue (tiredness). Cold symptoms are usually milder than the symptoms of flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems.

Is It a Cold or Is It Flu?

For more information visit: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/symptoms/index.html  

Check Your Coverage During National Preparedness Month

Check Your Coverage During National Preparedness Month

The third week of National Preparedness Month (NPM) 2018 begins on Sunday, September 16. Each week NPM focuses on a different action.

The theme for September 16-22 is, “Check Your Coverage.” Most homeowners’ and renters’ insurance does not cover flood damage. Safeguard your valuable assets with the following steps from the Ready Campaign:

  • Check your insurance coverage. You may need more coverage based on any new purchases, additions, or increases in property value.
  • Review the Document and Insure Your Property guide.
  • Save important documents to the cloud and snap photos of belongings to help file a claim.
  • Keep an inventory of your property’s contents.
  • Learn more about flood insurance and how to protect your home or business.

Take action to prepare this September. Join the National Day of Action on September 15.

You can find more including the NPM social media toolkit at Ready.gov/september.

How to Get Ready for a Natural disaster When You Have Cancer

How to Get Ready for a Natural disaster When You Have Cancer

If you are a cancer patient or caregiver and you learn a hurricane, wildfire, or other natural disaster is coming your way, take steps to prepare in advance.

  • Make a list of medicines and treatment schedules and store it in a handy place.
  • Discuss with your health care team the possibility of getting an extra supply of medicines, or if you should consider having any special equipment on hand.
  • Write down important phone numbers, such as for your doctors, clinic, and pharmacy.
  • Check with your health care team to find out who to call if you can’t get through to them using your regular methods.
  • If you are due for a treatment during the emergency, call your health care team to talk about options for getting to treatment or rescheduling.
  • Ask your health care team if you should get vaccinations for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, the flu, pneumococcus, tetanus, or other diseases that can sometimes come from unsafe conditions due to natural disasters.

If you’ve had to evacuate your home or treatment center, or if a storm or natural disaster has changed your treatment plan, follow these tips:

If you need help from the American Cancer Society, call  1-800-227-2345

  • If you’re in a temporary shelter, find out if health care professionals are on site. If so, let them know you have been getting cancer treatment and you need to get in touch with a doctor or hospital. You can check with NJ211 (211 on your phone) to find out what help is available in the county in which you live. If not, call the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345.
  • If you are sick, go to the nearest emergency room.
  • Try to keep taking your medicines on schedule. If you don’t have your medicines or don’t know where they are, try to get in touch with your pharmacy, doctor, clinic, or your health insurance company.
  • If you can’t get your medical records, write down everything you can remember about your treatment.
  • Protect yourself from germs by washing your hands as often as possible and drinking bottled water, or water that has been boiled for a full minute and then cooled.
  • Make sure meats are cooked thoroughly and fruits and vegetables are washed in clean water. Don’t eat cooked foods that have been left out at room temperature for more than 2 hours.
  • Keep any cuts or wounds covered with bandages unless your doctor has told you otherwise. Use antibiotic cream every day, if you have it.
  • Don’t share toothbrushes or eating utensils or cups with anyone else.
  • Don’t get vaccinations unless a doctor who knows your cancer history says it’s OK.

Source: American Cancer Society, September News You Can Use, August 24, 2018

https://www. cancer.org