Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths: How is the U.S. doing?

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About 90 people die each day in the US from crashes— resulting in the highest death rate among comparison countries.*

U.S. crash deaths fell 31% compared to an average of 56% in 19 other high-income countries* from 2000-2013.

Over 18,000 lives could be saved each year if U.S. crash deaths equaled the average rate of 19 other high-income countries.

Drivers and passengers can:

  • Use a seat belt in every seat, on every trip, no matter how short.
  • Make sure children are always properly buckled in the back seat in a car seat, booster seat, or seat belt, whichever is appropriate for their age, height, and weight.
  • Choose not to drive while impaired by alcohol or drugs, and help others do the same.
  • Obey speed limits.
  • Drive without distractions (such as using a cell phone or texting).

There were more than 32,000 crash deaths in the US in 2013. These deaths cost more than $380 million in direct medical costs.

Seat belts saved over 12,500 lives in the U.S. in 2013, yet:

  • The US had lower-than-average front and back seat belt use compared with other high-income countries.
  •  About half of drivers or passengers who died in crashes in the U.S. weren’t buckled up.

Want to learn more? www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/motor-vehicle-safety

*Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Israel,

 

Stay Cool in the Summer Heat

It is important to remember to stay hydrated (filled with fluids) when out in the summer heat. It doesn’t matter if you are working or just laying around trying to get a tan, you need to keep your body hydrated. If you wait until you are thirsty to drink water, you are already dehydrated.

The body loses water daily through water, tears, breathing, and other bodily functions. When in the heat, a person tends to sweat faster causing the body to lose water at a faster rate. The best way to replenish this lost is by drinking water. Drinking water can help keep the body hydrated when the body is working harder in the heat. Sometimes in dry heat you don’t even realize you are sweating because it evaporates so quickly. glass water

If you don’t replenish with water you will become dehydrated. If you become dehydrated, you may experience some of the following symptoms:

  • Dizziness
  • Thirst
  • Fatigue
  • Dry Skin
  • Increased heart rate and breathing

So just remember when you are out in the heat this summer bring a bottle of water with you!

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary/conditions/non-traumatic_emergencies/dehydration_and_heat_stroke_85,P00828/